Info Yellowstone National Park

Park entrance fees.

Private, noncommercial automobile (valid for 7 days at both Yellowstone and Grand Teton) $25

Individual motorcycle (7days, both parks) $20

Single entre (foot, bike, ski, etc. 7days, both parks) $12

Yellowstone and Grand Teton Annual Pass (valid 1 year) $50

America the beautiful (all Nat.Parks and Federal Recreation Land Pass, valid 1 year) $80

Senior pass (U.S. citizens or permanent residents +62) $10

Access pass (U.S. citizens or permanent residents with permanent disability) $0

Activities that require a permit

-fishing

-Boating or use of float tubes

-overnight backcountry camping

-Travel with a service animal in the backcountry

-All commercial services

-Commercial filming and photography with props or models (I almost couldn’t enter with Giorgia)

-Stock entry into the park requires cogging testing

Where to sleep

There are 12 places (camping ground/lodge rentals) in Yellowstone: just 1 opens all year long, 6 from May and 5 from June.  Most close at the end of September.

Camping sides have a ‘First come, first served’ policy, to our knowledge there are just 2 that permit reservations.

You can sleep for free in any National forest, just outside the Nat.Parks.

Famously hot features

-Hot springs: are the most common hydrothermal features in the park. They vary from frothing mocha-like boiling water to clear and calm pools of unfathomable depth (see Diane we are using a new vocabulary J)

-Mudpots: are acidic features with limited water supply. Their consistency and activity vary with seasons and precipitations.

-Fumaroles: or steam vents are the hottest hydrothermal features in the park. They are easier to see in cool weather.

-Travertine terraces: are found at the Mammoth Hot Springs, where the interactions of water and limestone create chalk-white travertine.

-Geysers: are hot springs with narrow spaces in their plumbing, usually near the surfaces. These constrictions prevent water from circulating freely to the surface where heat would escape. The deepest circulating water can exceed the surface boiling point.

¿¿¿Firearms???

Know your responsibilities!!!

Firearms are allowed in national parks pursuant to state and federal regulations. They are prohibited in facilities where signs are posted, such as Visitor Centers, Government Offices, and some Concession Operations. Discharge of firearms is prohibited. Possession and use of weapons, such as air guns, bows and arrows, spears and slingshots, is also prohibited.

(So basically you can have a gun but you can’t throw a stick!!! ;-D)

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